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Bible Greek

How Do You Say “Par Excellence” in Greek?

In the front of the Rahlfs-Hanhart edition of the Septuagint there is a brief “History of the Septuagint Text” written by Rahlfs. As Rahlfs describes the way first century Christians regarded the Old Testament, he casually drops a Greek word that occurs only once in the LXX and once in the NT. Of course, I […]

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Bible Greek Hebrew

Septuagint and New Testament

Chapter 9 of Jobes and Silva is about the relationship between the LXX and the NT. I thought their discussion of the relationship between the language of the LXX and NT was worth a few quotes here. The LXX and NT share a common language, yet there is “much linguistic diversity” throughout the literature. A Fact […]

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Aramaic Bible Greek Hebrew Productivity

Coming Soon: BibleWorks 9

A very intriguing post from the folks at BibleWorks. Looks like version 9 will feature significant integration of the high resolution digital images of biblical manuscripts available on the web! More information on the BibleWorks Manuscript Project is available here. To see what’s new in version 9, click here.

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Bible

“A New Testament Perspective on Power”

Slightly off-topic, but interesting (and edifying) nonetheless: Chris Tilling just tweeted a link to an excellent talk that he recently gave on the concept of power in the NT. According to Chris, in the NT and the ancient world in general, “power” is a theological concept. Yet in the NT power is understood in light of […]

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Bible

With Christ “in God”?

Today, while discussing the syntax of Romans 1:5 with a friend, I was reminded of a note I originally posted on Tumblr. It is related to Greek syntax, so I thought I would post it here, too. The Problem Because we have been raised with Christ, Colossians 3:1 tells us to “Seek the things above, […]

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Bible Greek

What Does “70” Have to Do with the Greek Old Testament?

The Greek Old Testament is commonly referred to as the Septuagint (from the Latin word for 70) or as the LXX. But why 70? The answer to this question lies in the legendary account of the circumstances surrounding the first Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible. The story begins with the Letter of Aristeas. Most scholars […]

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Bible Greek Hebrew

Re: “Septuagint”

The word “Septuagint” is quite slippery. In their first chapter Jobes and Silva note a few different ways the word is used and provide a little etymology: Etymology: “Septuagint” came into English from the Latin word Septuaginta (“seventy”), a shortened form of the title Interpretatio septuaginta virorum (“The Translation of the Seventy Men”). The Latin title arose from the […]

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Bible Greek Hebrew PhD

Why Study the Septuagint?

This is a summary of the reasons laid out by Jobes and Silva in their introductory chapter: For anyone interested in history: The Septuagint was the first translation made of any literary work of a size comparable to the Hebrew Bible. “It marks a milestone in human culture.” More manuscripts of the Greek Old Testament […]

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Bible Greek

Adolf Deissmann on the Value of the Studying the Septuagint

A single hour lovingly devoted to the text of the Septuagint will further our exegetical knowledge of the Pauline Epistles more than a whole day spent over a commentary. As quoted in Jobes and Silva, Invitation to the Septuagint, 23.

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Bible Greek

A Nugget from Silva

… There is no such thing as “Septuagint without tears” (indeed, without the affliction of trial-and-error, one seldom learns anything)… Karen Jobes and Moisés Silva, Invitation to the Septuagint, 10.