Tag: Jobes and Silva

Re: “Septuagint”

The word “Septuagint” is quite slippery. In their first chapter Jobes and Silva note a few different ways the word is used and provide a little etymology: Etymology: “Septuagint” came into English from the Latin word Septuaginta (“seventy”), a shortened form of the title Interpretatio septuaginta virorum (“The Translation of the Seventy Men”). The Latin title arose from the…

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Why Study the Septuagint?

This is a summary of the reasons laid out by Jobes and Silva in their introductory chapter: For anyone interested in history: The Septuagint was the first translation made of any literary work of a size comparable to the Hebrew Bible. “It marks a milestone in human culture.” More manuscripts of the Greek Old Testament…

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A Nugget from Silva

… There is no such thing as “Septuagint without tears” (indeed, without the affliction of trial-and-error, one seldom learns anything)… Karen Jobes and Moisés Silva, Invitation to the Septuagint, 10.

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