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Bible Greek

What Does “70” Have to Do with the Greek Old Testament?

The Greek Old Testament is commonly referred to as the Septuagint (from the Latin word for 70) or as the LXX. But why 70? The answer to this question lies in the legendary account of the circumstances surrounding the first Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible. The story begins with the Letter of Aristeas. Most scholars […]

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Bible Greek Hebrew

Re: “Septuagint”

The word “Septuagint” is quite slippery. In their first chapter Jobes and Silva note a few different ways the word is used and provide a little etymology: Etymology: “Septuagint” came into English from the Latin word Septuaginta (“seventy”), a shortened form of the title Interpretatio septuaginta virorum (“The Translation of the Seventy Men”). The Latin title arose from the […]

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Bible Greek Hebrew PhD

Why Study the Septuagint?

This is a summary of the reasons laid out by Jobes and Silva in their introductory chapter: For anyone interested in history: The Septuagint was the first translation made of any literary work of a size comparable to the Hebrew Bible. “It marks a milestone in human culture.” More manuscripts of the Greek Old Testament […]

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Bible Greek

Adolf Deissmann on the Value of the Studying the Septuagint

A single hour lovingly devoted to the text of the Septuagint will further our exegetical knowledge of the Pauline Epistles more than a whole day spent over a commentary. As quoted in Jobes and Silva, Invitation to the Septuagint, 23.

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Bible Greek

A Nugget from Silva

… There is no such thing as “Septuagint without tears” (indeed, without the affliction of trial-and-error, one seldom learns anything)… Karen Jobes and Moisés Silva, Invitation to the Septuagint, 10.