Tag: Textual Criticism

Ancient Errors, Modern Scribes

While checking notecards today, I came across a few modern examples of parablepsis and unintentional scribal changes — the kind of stuff normally discussed in introductions to textual criticism.((For example: Emanuel Tov, Textual Criticism of the Hebrew Bible (Minneapolis, MN: Fortress, 2012), 227ff.; Paul D. Wegner, A Students Guide to Textual Criticism of the Bible: Its History,…

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More Vermes on the Canon

There is an overwhelming consensus in the most recent scholarship that there was no such thing as “Bible” or “canon” in the Second Temple period, and that is why I find it so entertaining how boldly and shamelessly Vermes says things like this: Some colleagues found the phrase, “Rewritten Bible” anachronistic. It is maintained  by…

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Vermes on the Canon Issue

What did Geza Vermes think about the distinction between “Bible” (i.e. “canon”) and “Scripture”? The Spring 2013 issue of the Journal of Jewish Studies includes his review of Molly Zahn’s Rethinking Rewritten Scripture. At the beginning of this review, Vermes notes that he coined the term “Rewritten Bible” in 1961 in his Scripture and Tradition…

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Isaiah 9:6 | BHS on 1QIsa-a

In Isaiah 9:6 the apparatus of BHS says that 1QIsa-a reads למ רבה, with a space between the mem and resh. I don’t think there is a space between the two letters. Without the high-resolution images we have access to today, one might not be able to see just how closely the tail of the mem…

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